Working In Partnership Theddlethorpe

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Welcome

“Establishing the Theddlethorpe GDF Working Group marks the beginning of the process of finding out if this national infrastructure project – to safely and permanently deal with some of the UK’s radioactive waste by placing it deep underground in a Geological Disposal Facility (GDF) – would be right for the area.

“This is the starting point for engaging with people in Theddlethorpe and the surrounding areas. It’s about providing information and enabling people to find out more, about hearing local issues and concerns, and making sure people’s questions get answered.

“No decisions will be made for a long time and any decision about whether to support a development will need explicit community support.

“In the months ahead, I will ensure that local people have access to information and are able to raise their views and concerns. We’re here to understand what people think about the GDF project, and look forward to meeting local people and listening to their views.”

Jon Collins, Independent Chair of Theddlethorpe GDF Working Group

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What is a GDF?

A Geological Disposal Facility, or GDF, is an underground facility designed to safely and securely dispose of our radioactive waste – specifically ‘higher-activity’ waste (the most radioactive kind).

It involves building a series of specially designed and engineered vaults and tunnels deep underground. It could potentially be three times deeper than the height of the Shard in London, Britain’s tallest building.

Once the waste is placed inside a GDF, the facility will eventually be permanently sealed. The way the facility is designed and engineered means it can be sealed to protect people and the environment for hundreds of thousands of years, without needing any maintenance, while the radioactivity fades away naturally.

Making sure it is safe

Scientists and other authorities all over the world agree that a GDF is the safest way to deal with ‘higher-activity’ radioactive waste (the most radioactive kind) for the long term. This international consensus comes after decades of scientific research.

The Office for Nuclear Regulation and the Environment Agency will review the designs for a GDF, the proposed site, and the science that informs them, to make sure it protects people and the environment. A GDF will only be built if it can be shown to be safe for both people and the environment. As soon as construction starts on a GDF, the site will have to meet strict safety standards.

Which area is being considered?

Areas currently being considered in eastern Lincolnshire include the site around the former Theddlethorpe Gas Terminal. The community will be engaged in discussion throughout this process.

Further information can be found in the Working Group Area tab.

Once a Community Partnership has been formed it is expected that the initial ‘search area’ will be narrowed down. The community will be engaged in discussion via the Community Partnership throughout this process.

Who is part of the Working Group?

The Working Group includes an independent Chair, independent facilitator, representatives from RWM, Theddlethorpe Parish Council and Lincolnshire County Council.

To see a list of Working Group members click here.

Community and choice

The Working Group will start a conversation about geological disposal with the local community. It will propose an area for a future Community Partnership to consider, and work to identify who should be in that Community Partnership.

The Community Partnership can then continue the conversation, work to develop a vision for the future of the community and provide answers to people’s questions.

Then much later, when everyone’s had plenty of time to get informed and make up their minds, there will be a Test of Public Support. This will take the form of something like a poll or referendum that lets every voter in the electoral wards around the proposed site have their say about a GDF. Without their support, the project will not go ahead.

What is a GDF?

A Geological Disposal Facility, or GDF, is an underground facility designed to safely and securely dispose of our radioactive waste – specifically ‘higher-activity’ waste (the most radioactive kind).

It involves building a series of specially designed and engineered vaults and tunnels deep underground. It could potentially be three times deeper than the height of the Shard in London, Britain’s tallest building.

Once the waste is placed inside a GDF, the facility will eventually be permanently sealed. The way the facility is designed and engineered means it can be sealed to protect people and the environment for hundreds of thousands of years, without needing any maintenance, while the radioactivity fades away naturally.

Making sure it is safe

Scientists and other authorities all over the world agree that a GDF is the safest way to deal with ‘higher-activity’ radioactive waste (the most radioactive kind) for the long term. This international consensus comes after decades of scientific research.

The Office for Nuclear Regulation and the Environment Agency will review the designs for a GDF, the proposed site, and the science that informs them, to make sure it protects people and the environment. A GDF will only be built if it can be shown to be safe for both people and the environment. As soon as construction starts on a GDF, the site will have to meet strict safety standards.

Which area is being considered?

Areas currently being considered in eastern Lincolnshire include the site around the former Theddlethorpe Gas Terminal. The community will be engaged in discussion throughout this process.

Further information can be found in the Working Group Area tab.

Once a Community Partnership has been formed it is expected that the initial ‘search area’ will be narrowed down. The community will be engaged in discussion via the Community Partnership throughout this process.

Who is part of the Working Group?

The Working Group includes an independent Chair, independent facilitator, representatives from RWM, Theddlethorpe Parish Council and Lincolnshire County Council.

To see a list of Working Group members click here.

Community and choice

The Working Group will start a conversation about geological disposal with the local community. It will propose an area for a future Community Partnership to consider, and work to identify who should be in that Community Partnership.

The Community Partnership can then continue the conversation, work to develop a vision for the future of the community and provide answers to people’s questions.

Then much later, when everyone’s had plenty of time to get informed and make up their minds, there will be a Test of Public Support. This will take the form of something like a poll or referendum that lets every voter in the electoral wards around the proposed site have their say about a GDF. Without their support, the project will not go ahead.

Overview of siting process

This interactive diagram explains more about the GDF siting process.

Overview of siting process

This interactive diagram explains more about the GDF siting process.